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Dr. Hallowell's Blog

Archive for February, 2013

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

Dr. Hallowell Sheds Light on ADHD

Brilliant, Original, Pioneers, Dreamers. These are just some of the words that Dr. Hallowell used to describe children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder when he spoke to the families of children with ADHD at the Winston School in NJ on Feb 7th…  read more at:   http://thealternativepress.com/sections/health-and-wellness/articles/dr-edward-hallowell-sheds-light-on-adhd

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Dr. Hallowell: Should I Tell My Child She has ADHD?

I feel strongly that a child should be told they have ADHD.  Any child old enough to go through pyschological testing is old enough to be told the test results (though younger children need less detail than older kids).  I start with asking them simple questions:   “You know how you sometimes have trouble paying attention in school?” Jed nods. “That’s because your mind is zipping around all over the place, bursting with new ideas. And that’s great! That’s why you’ll do amazing things and have fun all your life. But you need help taking care of your race-car brain, so I’m going to teach you how to put on the brakes.”

If your child has questions, answer them. Just keep the answers simple, brief, and upbeat. It’s important for them not to feel defined by ADD. Having attention-deficit disorder is a bit like being left-handed. It is part of who you are, not who you are.  Read more in this ADDitude article on Talking About ADHD with Your Child.

To learn what to tell your school, read chapter 11 of SuperParenting for ADD.

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