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Dr. Hallowell's Blog

Archive for July, 2018

Friday, July 27th, 2018

Alone With Your Thoughts!

Let’s take some time to be alone with our thoughts this weekend. Try disconnecting from technology for several minutes. Take a stroll outside, sit quietly in your favorite chair or indulge in a long soak in the tub. It doesn’t matter how you decide to spend some quality time with yourself.  The point is to DO IT!

Learn more by listening now to my Distraction podcast with Sherry Turkle.

Have a wonderful weekend and please let me know how it felt to get to know yourself.

Tuesday, July 24th, 2018

KMOX Profiles Dr. Hallowell

Enjoyed speaking with Charlie Brennan for his show: KMOX Profiles when I was in St. Louis.

We discussed my Memoir, Because I Come From A Crazy Family  The Making Of A Psychiatrist, my family stories, why we need to blow the lid off mental illness and be open about who we are, ADHD, the importance of connections, getting the right help and more.

Listen to our chat HERE.

Learn more about changing the stigma of mental illness. 

Thursday, July 19th, 2018

Executive Function & College Readiness Workshop for College Students with ADHD

August 14, 2018  – 10:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Led by Dr. Jocelyn Lichtin, PhD

This workshop is a day-long course in executive functioning and related college-readiness skills for college students with ADHD. It derives from evidence-based – specifically, cognitivebehavioral – interventions for ADHD that have been shown to lead to significant improvements in ADHD-related symptoms and impairment.

Designed for: College students with ADHD

Objective: Students will learn strategies that lay the groundwork for positive habits, academic
success, and personal growth.

Details: Structured and didactic format. Tools are introduced and practiced in exercises
throughout the day. Small group format allows for individualized attention as well as support
amongst participants.

Students will learn to:

  • Manage time – including how to structure time, how to balance school work with social life, how long to spend on assignments, when to start, how to overcome procrastination
  • Prioritize healthy sleep habits
  • Organize paperwork and belongings
  • Effectively approach papers, projects, and exams
  • Manage meals, laundry, medication, exercise, and communication with family
  • Utilize on-campus supports and effectively advocate for yourself
  • Monitor emotions, combat unhelpful thinking patterns, utilize coping skills, and know when and how to
    seek help
  • Feel more confident about the ADHD diagnosis and begin to embrace differences
  • Throughout this program students learn about ADHD and the ADHD brain – including its assets and its
    weaknesses – and how the skills taught will leverage strengths to achieve goals

To enroll: Space is limited. To register, call 212.799.7777 or enroll at www.hallowellcenter.com.

Cost: $900 for the day and is nonrefundable and due upon enrollment.

What to bring: Reliable laptop (and charger) and spending money (for lunch, stationery supplies,and some toiletries). Breakfast and mid-afternoon snack will be provided. Students are requested to sign up for a Google account in advance of this workshop, and should bring their class schedule (if they have it) as well.

Location Information:
117 West 72nd Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10023
212.799.7777
Thursday, July 19th, 2018

ADHD Across the Life Span August 6-10

August 6-10, 2018

Educators, Parents, Adults with ADHD

Dr. Hallowell will share his unique approach on how to manage this most commonly diagnosed neurobehavioral disorder at the Cape Cod Institute, MA. Read Dr. Hallowell’s thoughts on ADHD here. 

There is still availability in most workshops and lodging.  Register now

Sunday, July 15th, 2018

Is Your Procrastination Style Working For You?

by Rebecca Shafir, M.A.CCC Personal Development and Executive Functioning coach at the Hallowell Center MetroWest

I bet you thought I was going to curse procrastination in this blog. Au contraire!  Not all procrastination is bad. As a matter of fact, putting off a major undertaking may give you time to consider the risks. On the other hand, you may have a style of procrastination that works very well for you. According to Mary Lamia in her book What Motivates Getting Things Done, procrastination is a problem when styles collide or when the deadlines are missed or met with unreasonable stress.

Before I talk about different styles of procrastination, let’s clarify the difference between good and bad stress. Good stress is excitement or intense curiosity, like the jitters you may experience before doing a talk. Bad stress is anxiety provoking, panicky, self-sabotaging and physiologically unhealthy for us and those around us.

Lamia distinguishes between Deadline-Driven and Task-Driven procrastination styles, DDPs and TDPs respectively. DDPs note the deadline and begin mentally planning the task in spurts without taking any overt action. They may let the idea incubate for several days and weeks. Come the last day, it all comes together. Many successful DDPs report a surge of “good stress” and a heightened state of focus within hours of the deadline. They often deliver their best work under pressure. If you’re DDP, and the fallout doesn’t take a toll on your health or the well-being of those around you, it’s a safe and effective strategy, so go with it.

TDPs will start tasks almost immediately, but not complete the tasks until later. They may be perfectionistic and postpone task completion until it meets a high level of quality. These folks have a hard time being satisfied with “good enough.” Yet the successful TDPs will manage many tasks at once and eventually meet their deadlines with a minimal amount of bad stress.

Since procrastination, the bad stress variety, is such a common complaint, I find it easier to help my clients become more efficient within a style that suits them versus trying to switch horses. It’s also good advice to share your style for meeting deadlines with co-workers and partners, as both styles can be unnerving to the non-procrastinator.

Would you like to make your style of procrastination more efficient or rid yourself of procrastination for good? Happy to help! Contact me at Rebecca@MindfulCommunication.com     

Thursday, July 12th, 2018

ADHD and Marriage Advice from the Hallowells

Since Distraction is taking a mini break before we start Season 3, they’re re-airing a few of our favorite episodes. So if you missed my podcast with my wife Sue on ADHD, you can listen to it HERE!

Sue doesn’t hold back and gives you a clear picture of what it’s like to be the only one in our house without ADHD.  You can watch this  YouTube video for a “behind the scenes view of this episode.”

CLICK HERE for more tips on managing ADHD and Marriage.

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