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Archive for the ‘ADHD’ Category

Friday, June 28th, 2019

Superparenting for ADHD

The worst is not knowing what is going on, having nowhere to turn for help, feeling you or your child are constantly being misunderstood and even attacked, and feeling helpless in the face of ongoing problems and conflicts. The worst is feeling alone. The worst is knowing that your child is not getting what he or she needs and not knowing what to do about it. The worst is watching your child suffer and not being able to provide the right kind of help. The worst is the feeling of powerlessness in the face of unjust and unwarranted pain in the life of your child.

In that sense, the worst is over. We can help and guide you, and even more important, join you so that you no longer feel alone.  Whether you are a parent or a grandparent, you are invited to attend online for FREE the 2nd annual Parents’ ADHD Palooza  beginning July 29th through August 3rd, 2019.

Join Dr. Hallowell on August 2nd as he shares his innovative approach to raising your distracted child and tips on Superparenting for ADHD.  There are 29 other parenting legends and luminaries sharing their expertise for this extraordinary week of insight and inspiration.

The event is hosted by Linda Roggli of ADDiva.net and Elaine Taylor-Klaus and Diane Dempster of ImpactADHD.com. the ADHD Parents’ Palooza will improve the way you parent kids with ADHD!

Register for free HERE and reserve your spot now! The ADHD Parents’ Palooza will improve the way you parent kids with ADHD!

 

Thursday, June 27th, 2019

College and ADHD

Success in college is more about getting work done, done well and on time (“executive function skills and routines”) than IQ!
If you or a student you know has ADHD, his or her ability to get work done, done well and on time could be compromised. Summer CollegeCore Coaching prepares students’ executive function skills and routines in advance to secure a happier, healthier and more accomplished academic year.

CollegeCORE Coaching (by phone, Skype or in person) helps high school upperclassmen and college students conquer the most common problems associated with ADHD or Executive Dysfunction. Rebecca provides effective, practical and non-medication solutions for getting things done well and on time. She has worked with ADHD students and entrepreneurs for over 20 years. Read more at www.MindfulCommunication.com.  Rebecca’s coaching and training approach builds the core skills and routines that enable success in school and greater marketability for the workplace.

CollegeCORE students will learn:

  • core skills and routines for managing anxiety and improving focus, follow through and communication
  • to become more independent, and how to be the CEO of YOU, even if you don’t plan to be an entrepreneur
  • basic organizational skills
  • problem-solving skills
  • note-taking skills
  • more efficient study and test-taking skills
  • why good sleep is a major ally for the ADHD student, sleep’s powerful role in learning and ways to improve sleep quality
  • how exercise regimen best promotes clearer thinking and improved productivity
  • how to apply Rebecca’s 80/20 approach for managing procrastination
  • how to self-advocate – a competitive life skill.

How CollegeCore Coaching works: The process begins with a complimentary 15-20 minute inquiry call with Rebecca. Call to set up that inquiry session (978) 287-0810 or (978) 255-1817. This is a brief discussion to answer questions about the program and to determine whether the CollegeCore coaching approach is appropriate for the student.

A 90 minute meeting (in person, Skype or phone) follows to get background information, identify personal strengths, establish personal objectives, deadlines (if imposed) for improvement, and to determine best approaches. $325.00

Based on that meeting an action plan is created and the frequency of coaching sessions is determined. The goal is to identify the best starting point(s), select a couple small steps that are fairly easy to implement consistently that will yield some early and notable results. These new routines become habits.  Minor adjustments are made along the way. For some, the compound effect will work best, for others a multi-target approach is better. The process is customized to the student and his/her needs. Coaching sessions are $150/hour, $75/30 minutes. Sessions may be 1-3x a week; duration and frequency is determined by Rebecca and the student. A spouse, partner or co-founder may also be involved, if desired. Progress is addressed at each session. As the gains become more consistent and the student more independent, the coaching sessions wind down. Check-in sessions are monthly or bi-monthly, then every six months or as needed.

To set up a CollegeCORE inquiry session or to make an appointment with Rebecca Shafir, Speech/language pathologist, voice coach, executive functioning coach and author, contact:

The Hallowell Center BostonMetroWest in Sudbury MA at (978) 287-0810 or her

West Newbury office (978) 255-1817 to schedule sessions in person or by phone or Skype.

Tuesday, June 11th, 2019

Recognition Responsive Euphoria

Over the past few years, Dr. William Dobson has helped multitudes of people of all ages who have ADHD by developing the concept of “rejection sensitive dysphoria,” or RSD.  The painful syndrome of feeling acute and profound dejection at even the slightest perceived insult or “dis” is common among those of us who have ADHD.

I’ve observed a sister syndrome of RSD in my 69 years of living with ADHD and my 38 years of treating the condition in children and adults.  This sister syndrome is, in my experience, even more common that RSD.  I call it:

“Recognition Responsive Euphoria,” or RRE.

Perhaps because people who have untreated ADHD are so accustomed to making mistakes and receiving criticism, they become positively giddy when they receive positive recognition.  The best way to get them charged up and motivated is to praise—legitimately, honestly—some element of a project they’re working on, an outfit they’re wearing, a proposal they’re developing, an idea they’re hatching.

 My friend, John Croyle, head of the home for abandoned children in Alabama called Big Oak Ranch, told me years ago that one of the best ways to instill hope in kids who have lost hope is to “be a dream maker, not a dream breaker.”  That’s all about providing recognition for whatever positive action a person might perform.  It helps everyone.  However, for people who have ADHD, it takes us to a whole new level.

The typical day of a person who has ADHD—of any age—if it is not treated is rife with frustration, rejection, and failure.  But it is also true that people with ADHD are remarkably resilient and spunky.  One of the best ways to get them going in a good direction, in spite of all the negativity they have to contend with, is to find something positive to recognize in what they are doing and notice it.  Go for it.  You will quickly see eyes light up, and the person swing into action like a whirling dervish of positive energy.

I’ve written a lot of books.  But I couldn’t have written a single one of them without frequent doses of positive energy—recognition, encouragement, doses of keep on keepin’ on—to keep me going.  Thank God my wife, Sue, seems to have an endless store.

Make sure you find people who have lots encouragement and recognition to give.  They are precious.  Some people are notoriously stingy with it, as if it were a valuable coin not to be parted with.  True, it’s not to be given underserved, for then it loses all its power.  But neither should it be withheld until a person produces achievement worthy of a Nobel Prize.

If you have ADHD, and you find that you are low on motivation, energy, and are not working up to your potential, a reason for that very well may be that you are not getting enough recognition.  Once you find the right person or better a still, the right people to give you that recognition, then you can tap into the tremendous power of Recognition Responsive Euphoria.

If you need it, it does not mean you are weak.  I need it like crazy, and I am not weak.  Most people who achieve in creative fields need it like crazy, and they are not weak.  People with ADHD need it, and we are anything but weak.  People with ADHD are some of the strongest people in the world, emotionally, constitutionally, never-give-up-wise.

So know this about yourself and others with ADHD and plan how to tap into and get or give Recognition Responsive Euphoria!

Wednesday, May 1st, 2019

Removing the Stigma of ADHD

Dr. Hallowell says, “Fear and shame are the major learning disabilities.”  Getting rid of shame and fear are key! Kids, and this includes kids with ADHD, Dyslexia or any learning challenge, need to feel emotionally safe in the classroom and at home.

In Ep 35, Perfectly Obstinate People with Kathy Kolbe on Removing the Stigma of ADHD, Kathy Kolbe and Dr. Hallowell discuss their views on ADHD and the importance of removing the stigma associated with ADHD. Dr. Hallowell shares his tips on how to harness the power of ADHD.  Listen now using any of the links below:

Perfectly Obstinate People website: https://perfectlyobstinate.com/25

iTunes: https://apple.co/2IS9FYv

Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2GROYIN

Learn more about ADHD here.

 

Saturday, April 27th, 2019

ADHD Advice for Middle Schoolers

In S3 Mini 29, Dr. Hallowell offers up tips for helping your  6th, 7th and 8th graders manage their ADHD so they can thrive during these critical years.

If you just found out that your child has ADHD, learn more HERE.

Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW CLOSED: Wanted: Women Who Have Not Been Diagnosed with ADHD

We are no longer accepting applications.  THANK YOU to everyone who volunteered.  The producer is still reviewing applications. When a final decision is made, we will notify everyone who applied.

Note from Dr. Hallowell below:

When I sent out the invitation to participate in my upcoming documentary, I didn’t know what kind of response to expect, since I had never sent out such an appeal before.  I knew it would take some courage to reply, because appearing on screen before an international audience is no small exposure, and I also knew I was restricting the invitation to women over 24 who believed they had ADHD but in whom it had not been diagnosed.  For all I knew, I’d get only one or two responses.

Well,  we have received over 1000 responses and counting!  I can’t thank you enough.  I am so moved.  It is a testament to the courage, generosity, and desire to help others of this community, and proof of your ongoing willingness to stand up and be counted.  I am so very, very impressed.  It’s easy to remain silent in anonymity, but it takes real guts to say, “OK, I’ll give it a shot, I’m willing to share my story on an international stage if it will help others.”  

Honestly, your response gave me a huge shot of faith-in-human-nature, a massive drink from the cup of people-are-there-when-you-need-them.  None of you had to reply, there was nothing in it for you, nothing but the chance to help others and share what you’ve lived through.  It proved to me what I’ve known all along, that this community if full of hugely generous, giving, trusting, good people.

We hope this project, this documentary, will advance the strength-based model of ADHD that I’ve been building since I learned about ADHD back in 1981.  The time has come to demolish the deficit-based model.  Yes, as my friend and greatly respected colleague Russell Barkley has shown, untreated ADHD can ruin your life, costing you on average 13 years, but if you take care of your ADHD can treat it properly, it can take you to the top, as it did for Tim Armstrong, as it did for David Neeleman, founder of JetBlue, or Heather Reisman, CEO of Canada’s Indigo Books, or Richard Branson of Virgin Airlines, or so many of the entrepreneurs who built this country and other countries and are making the world great today.

Thank you all for joining this great effort. The time has come for us to rise up victorious, stigmatized and shamed no more, and stake our claim as the brilliant, innovative, and valued creators we can be.

With my heartfelt best wishes,

Ned Hallowell

————————————————

               Hello my friends. In this note from Ned I want to make an unusual offer.  I am in the middle of collaborating with some wonderful people in making a documentary about ADHD.  We want it to present this condition with emphasis on the strengths that so often accompany it, as we hope the documentary will go a long way toward combating the terrible stigma that still prevents both children and adults from getting the help that could change their lives forever.

              While we will be emphasizing strengths, we will also portray the terrible dangers inherent in not taking ADHD seriously, the great risk of addiction, of unemployment in adulthood, of poor school performance, of medical problems due to lack of follow up, and the host of other problems that have led Dr. Russell Barkley to conclude that untreated ADHD costs on average 13 years of life.  It’s a high risk proposition.  We want the public to understand that this condition can ruin your life or it can make your life great.  We want to blow away stigma and replace it with knowledge and truth so that people can take advantage of the upside.

               My offer is this.  If you’d like to be part of this truth, if you’d like to appear in the documentary, please get in touch with me.  Because adult women are the largest undiagnosed group, we are looking for adult women who have not been diagnosed before with ADHD but believe they might have it.  If you are such a person, or know such a person, and if you’d like to be filmed for a documentary that will be released internationally, then please contact my assistant, Dianne, at hallowellevents@yahoo.com.

               The producers will screen you to see if you are appropriate, and if you are, I will do an evaluation free of charge and begin treatment, also free of charge.  This entire process, after the screening, could be filmed.

                Obviously, this is not for everyone.  But if you are the kind of person who’d like to appear on screen and make a difference by showing what ADHD is really like, by showing the strengths and the power it packs, as well as the frustrations, and if you are a woman over 24 years old and you believe you might have ADHD, then contact Dianne.

                 We hope this documentary will make a big difference.  It won’t come out until January of 2021, so there’s a lot of work yet to be done.  Let us know if you want to be part of it.

                  With all best wishes,   Ned

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