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Archive for the ‘Crazy Busy Life’ Category

Friday, March 30th, 2018

Curbing Your Cell Phone Addition

One of the biggest drains on time and mental energy in modern life is what I call “screen sucking,” mindlessly sending and receiving emails, texting, surfing the net or checking your cell phone or any number of devices while walking, driving, or brushing your teeth. Sound familiar?
Take a few minutes now and ask yourself, “How much time do I spend on my phone each day?” How much time does that add up to in a week? Is this how I want to live my life?
If you want to stop technology from draining the life out of you so you can start enjoying the human moment and more, try implementing the 3 tips below:
Step #1  SET A GOAL. How much total time should be spent each day on electronics. Then break the total goal into time categories: how much time where, doing what, with whom.
Step #2 PLAN DAILY PERIODS OF ABSTINENCE. These “brain breaks” provide intervals of time in which no electronic device may be turned on. Yes, this will be difficult for you at first. So try beginning with 10 minutes twice a day. Then increase that time by 10 minutes a week until you reach 1 hour a day or goal you all want to achieve. Go one step further, plan a “de-tox” day over the weekend.
Step # 3 Replenish daily your dose of the other Vitamin C, Vitamin Connect. Overuse of electronics depletes one’s store of the human connection. Spend time having a face-to-face conversation with people, uninterrupted by anything. Try banning electronics when you’re out with friends or during dinner.
Want more tips on managing technology,  listen to my Distraction mini 45 “Your  Annual Screen Sucking Self Exam.”
Want to learn more about Connect, the other Vitamin C? Click here.
Monday, March 26th, 2018

Time is Precious

Sages through the ages have cautioned us to Seize the Day. And yet we don’t.

Time… rolls unnoticed.
We spend it.
We waste it.
We even kill it.
Time is a finite resource, but we behave as if it were infinite because, at the deepest level, we deny the fact of death in our everyday lives.
Only a fool… or a person too busy to think….will not do what it takes to live life to its fullest while he can.
Are you doing what matters most to you? Take an inventory today on how you spend your time and try to get the best return on your investment. 

3 Tips to managing your time:

  1. Do what matters most to you:  One way to wrestle back control is to take a hard look at our priorities and decide what matters.” Don’t spread yourself too thin – you must choose, you must prioritize.
  2. Learn to say, “No thank you.” Be careful not to overcommit.
  3. Slow down: Stop, think and ask  yourself, what’s your hurry?  Why wake up, already impatient, and rush around and try to squeeze in more things than you should, thereby leading you to do all of it less well?  Your hurry is your enemy.

Dr. Hallowell explains how to Curtail, Delegate and Eliminate.

Friday, March 16th, 2018

The Real Danger of Digital Addiction

The Brain Equivalent of Global Warming The Real Danger of Digital Addiction by Dr. Hallowell / Psychology Today

Nobody’s proven that digital addiction rots your brain.  Nobody’s proven that gaming 18 hours a day is bad for you; that texting 14 hours a day harms you in any way; that spending 16 hours in front of a screen per day is in any way toxic; that emailing is less healthy than face-to-face communication; that tele-communcation sacrifices any zest; as we gradually replace human moments with electronic ones we are losing anything at all. READ MORE.

TIPS FOR DISCONNECTING FROM YOUR DEVICES:

  • DON’T WASTE TIME SCREEN SUCKING (a modern addiction of looking at your iPhone, computer, any type of screen): Break the habit of having to be near your electronic devices at all times by changing your environment or structure.
  • SET A GOAL. How much total time should be spent each day on electronics. Then break the total goal into time categories: how much time where, doing what, with whom.
  • PLAN DAILY PERIODS OF ABSTINENCE. These “brain breaks” provide intervals of time in which no electronic device may be turned on. Yes, this will be difficult for you. So try beginning with 10 minutes twice a day. Then increase that time by 10 minutes a week until you reach 1 hour a day or
    goal you all want to achieve. Then “Turn It Off.”
Tuesday, February 6th, 2018

How to Break Cell Phone Addiction

How many times do you reach for your phone during the day? At night?  Break the habit of having to be on your cell phone or other electronic devices at all times by  scheduling an amount of time to:

Turn it off!

It is that simple; and that hard!

I believe our constant use of cell phones, social media, and email  can actually slow productivity and lead to culturally-induced attention deficit disorder, both in adults and children. So schedule some time now to T.I.O. (turn it off!)

Visit Distraction.com for Dr. Hallowell’s tips on coping and connecting in our crazybusy world.

Read Crazybusy for strategies on coping in a world gone ADD.

 

Friday, September 29th, 2017

10 Tips to Managing Modern Life

iPhone 5S CB

Free CrazyBusy  Tips App

Being too busy can become a habit so entrenched that it leads you to postpone or cut short what matters most to you, making you a slave to a lifestyle you don’t like but can’t escape.  In part, it is the desire for control that leads people to lose it.  Modern life makes us feel as if we can be everywhere and do everything and gives us the magical tools to heighten the illusion. Dr.  Hallowell offers the following 10 principles to managing your time, attention and energy in this CrazyBusy world to help you can take back control, lead a sane life and be the person you really want to be

  1. Do what matters most to you:  Don’t spread yourself too thin – you must choose, you must prioritize. Be careful not to overcommit. Learn to say, “No thank you.”
  2. Create a positive emotional environment wherever you are: When the emotional atmosphere is less than positive, people lose flexibility, trust, enthusiasm, patience, humor, and creativity.  When you feel safe and secure, you feel welcomed and appreciated, you think better, behave better, and are better able to help others.
  3. Find your rhythm:  Get in the “zone”, follow your “flow.” When you find your rhythm, you allow your day to be taken care of by the automatic pilot in your brain, so the creative, thinking part can attend to what it is uniquely qualified to attend to.
  4. Invest your time wisely so as to get maximum return:  Try not to let time be stolen from you or let yourself fritter it away.  Attention is like money: if we don’t watch how we spend it, we waste it.
  5. Don’t waste time screen sucking (a modern addiction of looking at your iPhone, computer, any type of screen): Break the habit of having to be near your electronic devices at all times by changing your environment or structure. Schedule an amount of time you are allowed to be on the computer; plan mandatory breaks. Just “Turn It Off.”
  6. Identify and control the sources of gemmelsmerch in your environment:  Gemmelsmerch, the force that distracts a person from what he or she wants to or ought to be doing, is as pervasive and powerful as gravity.
  7. DelegateDelegate what you don’t like to do or are not good at.  Your goal should be not to be independent, but rather effectively interdependent.  You do for me and I do for you – this is what makes life possible.
  8. Slow down:  Stop and think.  Ask yourself, what’s your hurry?  Why wake up, already impatient, and rush around and try to squeeze in more things than you should? Your hurry is your enemy.
  9. Don’t multitask ineffectively (avoid frazzling):  Try giving one task your full attention.  You will do it better.
  10. Play:   Imaginatively engage with what you are doing.  This will bring out the best part of your mind, focus you on your task, and make you more effective and efficient.

Adapted from CrazyBusy Overstretched, Overbooked and About to Snap! Strategies for Coping in a World Gone ADD, Ballentine, NY, 2006.

Tuesday, October 25th, 2016

I USED TO BE A HUMAN BEING!

A common, recurring theme of the  “DISTRACTION”  weekly podcasts that Dr. Hallowell hosts, is the belief that “screen-sucking,” our obsession with smartphones and computer screens, is draining the life out of us and making it harder to experience the joys of true relationships and connections. Last month, New York Magazine ran a cover story entitled “I Used to be a Human Being,” in which the author explains how the internet broke him and led him down a path of chronic distraction. Here are some of Dr. Hallowell’s thoughts after reading the article.

Andrew Sullivan’s Sept. 16 New York Magazine article, “I Used to be a Human Being,” blasts a social warning as urgent as the environmental warning of climate change. The latter could cost us our planet; the former our souls.

As a psychiatrist who specializes in attention deficit disorder (and has A.D.D. himself), I’ve seen a dramatic change over the past decade. We’ve ushered in what I call The Age of Distraction, a world in which just about everyone acts and feels as if they have true ADD when, in fact, only a small fraction actually do.

When a new patient comes to see me suspecting he or she might have ADD, the most common differential diagnosis I entertain is between actual ADD and what I call “a severe case of modern life.” Modern life is ADD-o-genic. If you wake up without ADD, you feel as if you’ve come down with a fulminant case of it by the time you go to bed.

What began as a joke, the “CrackBerry” and the like, has mushroomed into anything but a joke. Electronic devices have triggered our newest addiction, as potentially destructive as all addictions can be.

The issue is complicated by the fact that the standard remedy for an addiction–abstinence–does not apply here. For most people, electronic devices are necessary in everyday life. The most apt comparison is to food. No one can abstain from food. Each of us must struggle to learn the skill of moderation around food and now around electronic devices.

Unlike global warming, solving this problem does not depend upon sweeping governmental policies. But it does depend upon sweeping personal policies and policies in families, businesses, and all other organizations.

T.I.O. Turn it off. Learn moderation before you lose the qualities that elevate life beyond mere data-processing, before you lose your soul and your ability to notice what you’ve lost.

Go to DISTRACTION.com to learn more tips about managing modern life.

Dr. Hallowell’s book, “CrazyBusy” offers strategies for handling your fast-paced life.

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