Wanted: Women Who Have Not Been Diagnosed with ADHD

We are no longer accepting applications.  THANK YOU to everyone who volunteered.  The producer is still reviewing applications. When a final decision is made, we will notify everyone who applied.

Hello my friends. In this note from Ned I want to make an unusual offer.  I am in the middle of collaborating with some wonderful people in making a documentary about ADHD.  We want it to present this condition with emphasis on the strengths that so often accompany it, as we hope the documentary will go a long way toward combatting the terrible stigma that still prevents both children and adults from getting the help that could change their lives forever.

While we will be emphasizing strengths, we will also portray the terrible dangers inherent in not taking ADHD seriously, the great risk of addiction, of unemployment in adulthood, of poor school performance, of medical problems due to lack of follow up, and the host of other problems that have led Dr. Russell Barkley to conclude that untreated ADHD costs on average 13 years of life.  It’s a high risk proposition.  We want the public to understand that this condition can ruin your life or it can make your life great.  We want to blow away stigma and replace it with knowledge and truth so that people can take advantage of the upside.

My offer is this.  If you’d like to be part of this truth, if you’d like to appear in the documentary, please get in touch with me.  Because adult women are the largest undiagnosed group, we are looking for adult women who have not been diagnosed before with ADHD but believe they might have it.  If you are such a person, or know such a person, and if you’d like to be filmed for a documentary that will be released internationally, then please contact my assistant, Dianne, at hallowellevents@yahoo.com.

The producers will screen you to see if you are appropriate, and if you are, I will do an evaluation free of charge and begin treatment, also free of charge.  This entire process, after the screening, could be filmed.

Obviously, this is not for everyone.  But if you are the kind of person who’d like to appear on screen and make a difference by showing what ADHD is really like, by showing the strengths and the power it packs, as well as the frustrations, and if you are a woman over 24 years old and you believe you might have ADHD, then contact Dianne.

We hope this documentary will make a big difference.  It won’t come out until January of 2021, so there’s a lot of work yet to be done.  Let us know if you want to be part of it.

With all best wishes,   Ned

Your ADHD Brain is a Ferrari

My goal is to help people master the power of ADHD while avoiding its pitfalls. When the diagnosis of ADHD emphasizes what is wrong with a person, that person immediately starts to see himself in those negative terms. Shame, fear and self-doubt grow. However, when the treatment of ADHD begins with an effort to find what’s good in a person by using a strength-based approach to ferret out their hidden strengths and emphasizes what is positive, then the person sees himself in a positive light.  

When explaining ADHD to a child, I say, “you have a turbo charged mind – like a Ferrari engine, but the brakes of a bicycle, and I’m the break expert.”   When ADHD is properly treated, the person can achieve great heights: doctors, lawyers, CEO’s, dreamers, innovators, explorers and even Harvard grads.   Founders of our country may have had ADHD. The flip-side of distractibility is curiosity.  

Read my ADDitude article “Your Brain is a Ferrari,” to learn more and watch my “RaceCar Brain” video below:

If you just found out your child has ADHD, learn more HERE.

ADHD and Addiction

Of the many masks that ADHD wears, substance abuse is one of the most difficult to see behind because the substance abuse itself causes such problems. When someone is alcoholic, abusing opiates, or vaping, we often become so preoccupied with the problems the drug use creates that we fail to consider what purpose the drug must be servicing for the user. ADHD is one of the underlying causes of substance abuse that is particularly important to look for, because it can be treated.

For those addicts who do in fact have ADHD, it is essential that the ADHD be treated as well as the addiction. By treating the ADHD one reduces the likelihood that the individual will go back to abusing the original drug.

Those with ADHD are 5 to 10 times more likely to develop an addiction to a chemical substance or to an activity, or both. In Distraction S3 Ep 28,  ADHD coach and advanced practice nurse, Kristin Seymour, joins me to discuss the very real issue of ADHD and addiction in young people. Kristin specializes in treating adolescent boys and has seen firsthand the devastating consequences that vaping, opioids and other substances can have on young lives.

LISTEN NOW  to my podcast with Kristin and learn more about ADHD and addiction, the harmful effects of juuling and the advice you should stress to your kids about pills.

Statistically only 10% of people with addictions, get help. That means 90% of addicts don’t seek treatment. If you or someone you know are struggling with addiction, I encourage you to seek help for yourself or the person you know now.

Learn more about ADHD treatment HERE

Learn more about getting help for addiction at the:

National Institute on Drug Abuse

National Drug Helpline

This episode is sponsored by Landmark College, the college of choice for students who learn differently. Learn more HERE.